Ombudsman | Meaning and Definition

Who is an Ombudsman? 

An ombudsman, sometimes known as an “ombud,” is a neutral third person who helps people resolve issues with institutions such as governments, universities, healthcare, news organizations, and companies.

An ombudsman is a neutral third person who helps people resolve issues with various institutions. Although they are frequently employed or appointed by the institution against which a person files a complaint, the ombudsman is not responsible for representing the interests of the entity that hires them.

Ombudsman is customer-centric and one-of-a-kind in that they can preserve anonymity while aiding individuals or groups with their issues. 

Types Of Ombudsmen

  •     Classical Ombudsmen – Classical ombudsman offices handle complaints and issues regarding government policies. They can be elected or appointed, and they have the authority to examine complaints and make changes.
  •     Hybrid Ombudsmen – Advocate ombudsman services are available in both the public and private sectors. They will examine claims objectively, but they may have the authority to argue on your side. Advocate ombudsmen are widespread in long-term care settings.
  •     Media Ombudsmen – Media ombudsmen, endeavor to ensure that their news company is transparent. They will look into citizen complaints regarding news reporting and offer recommendations to help address issues.
  •     Legislative Ombudsmen – Legislative ombudsman serve in the legislative arm of government, with the objective of holding government entities respond to the people. They look into public or government employee complaints concerning government policies.